Tag: consultation

How We Evaluate Cases

While many situations may in fact be “adverse” or otherwise objectionable to the employee from their perspective, not all situations and appeals will result in an outcome favorable to the employee.

Responding to Proposed Suspensions

Employees facing discipline must be responsive to the agency notice.  It is important affected employees act quickly and immediately begin preparing a reply as appropriate.  Even if an employee does not intend to challenge the proposed action, an employee may effectively mitigate the proposed action to a lesser degree or achieve an alternative outcome.

MSPB: No Absolute Right to Counsel

Recently, a Federal employee argued the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) “abused its discretion” by failing to appoint (and pay for) an attorney to represent her.

“In Lieu Of” Removal

Federal employees faced with removal possess the ability to resign prior to the effective date of the removal action.  Employees otherwise eligible for retirement maintain the ability to retire prior to and after the effective date of removal.

When to Contact a Consultant

“When should I contact a consultant? Should I wait until the Agency proposes an action or makes a decision?”  Also, “Will my union pay associated fees or help me in any other way?”

Opportunity for Discovery

We will introduce employees to the general concept of discovery in both MSPB (adverse actions including removal, demotion, etc.) and EEOC (EEO complaints) proceedings and encourage the employee who may be self-representing (Pro Se) to engage the process.

Consulting Questions

These questions are our most frequently asked concerning consulting services for federal employees.  Though we try to provide as much information as possible, you may have a question not included here.  Please feel free to contact us.

What Your Union Doesn’t Know Can Hurt You

The representation of federal employees in discipline and adverse actions is complicated.  In our experience, most local labor unions are not technically prepared to provide such representation to safeguard an employee’s career and future financial security.

Last Chance Agreements

Last chance agreements (LCA’s) and settlements contain terms agreed to by an (federal) employee, or former employee, and the agency, in which the employee is provided an opportunity to retain (or return to) employment, usually when the agency would otherwise remove, or did in fact already remove, the employee from federal employment.